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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
labs are opening their doors to scientists of tomorrow. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project
are opening their doors to scientists of tomorrow. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project including the li
health risks. >> we had to keep pushing. science is the basis of everything. the 482 megawatt coal-fired facility owners say that the today is lesse about pollution control and more change in price for gas.al what happens now with this prime waterfront property currently owned by pepco -- >> it's an opportunity to have something exciting to happen in of mixed use development. now 15th thousand tons of begins. 15,000 tons. most of the employees have been or retired. six are still looking for work. >> jacqui jeras has a look at forecast. >> we started out really foggy northwest of the metro area this morning. here's an awesome time lapse i from oakdaleyou ijamsville.in look at the that shallow layer to awhich gave way beautiful sunny conditions. we goill change as throughout the day. clouds mostly on the increase. inyou can see them pushing from the south. that will bring a chance of rain. heavy rain across the tennessee river valley as well as parts of south.p that system will be with us the couple days. if you are traveling today, memphis, raleigh, charlotte, all of the leas. newar
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "early start." an american astronaut about to hitch a ride with the russians up to the international space station. later this month, nasa's kevin ford will join two russian astronauts aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft that will blast them into orbit for a five-month stay. ford will join the station's current team and take over as expedition commander. this will mark for the second space flight and his first aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft. kevin ford is joining us live now from the cosmonaut training center in star city, russia, where he and his crewmates have been preparing for the mission. thank you for being with us. you will be at that time iss from the end of the month until march of next year. can you tell us what you will be doing while you are there? >> well, i can't tell you exactly what we will be doing but i can tell you what we plan to do. so we -- we hope to carry out a lot of science. we had a lot of trainin
science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations he has for himself. but look, i think part of that was because as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney, we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan, which was his tax cut. i don't have a tax plan that is 4.8 trillion, i am not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a voucher plan, i love teachers, i think we need more of them. don't believe me, speaker gingrich was eloquent in the primaries, saying that mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> the president had 90 minutes, now, if he had done his homework and prepared, if he had actually studied romney, why didn't he say it? virtually every analyst has said, and even your deputy campaign manager has said the charges -- was made wrong. forgetting that for a second, the job of the president is supposed to be able to be competent and to stand up for what he believes in and articulate what is wrong. mitt romney walked over him. >> and alex, you mentioned the president is air born to the golden s
baby. >> doing math with the gets? >> doing s.t.e.avenue. m. >> science, technology, engineering, art and math. >> hey, do you do "gangnam style." >> what does that mean? >> gangnam sfooil? >> psy. the horse dance. >> the horse dance. >> you got it. >> like that. >> there we go. >> oh, yeah. oh, yeah. ♪ >> almost as good as david gregory. >> you name, it elmo can do it. >> there we go. >> that was fantastic. >> let's talk about -- did you read the "new york times." >> yeah, "new york times." there's an article that the word really is overused. >> really? >> really. >> really. >> a whole article devoted to, that really? >> really. >> it used to be kind of like that's surprising, but now it's that snarky really? >> really. >> really. >> it has been overused. by the writers and shows to make that kind of funny turn. it has been a little overused. what are some other -- i'm actually thinking of like, you know, like. >> like, and, you know, i'm a complete offender. >> seriously. >> serious ly. >> really? >> what words are overused? >> elmo loves overusing love. >> oh. >> you can't overus
their heads thinking there is no way this could possibly work. the practices have no basis in science or medicine and they will now be relegated to the dust bin of quackery, your governor, david, is calling what you do quackery. can you just react to that and tell me how this new law will affect what you do? >> yes. let me tell you what kind of governor we have now. so, for instance, if a child is -- let me tell you first, any good competent therapist knows that homosexual feelings can result when one -- i'm talking about boys now, when one is raped or sexually molested. later in life, those feelings come up. what our governor decided now he knows best that the kind of profound affective therapy is quackery, that handles this kind of situation. >> david, how about the american psychiatric -- forgive me, i'll add on to the governor, the american psychiatric association says the potential risk of reparative therapy is great including depression, anxiety, self-destructive behavior, reparative therapy, this is the truth wins out, reparative therapy is junk science winning out by religious
by preparing a hundred thousand additional... math and science teachers; training two million... americans with the job skills they need at our community... colleges; cutting the growth of tuition in half and... expanding student aid so more americans can afford it.t. fourth, a balanced plan to reduce our deficit by... four trillion dollars over the next decade, on top of the... trillion in spending we've already cut. i'd ask the wealthy to pay a little more. and as we end the war in afghanistan... let's apply half the savings to pay down our debt and... use the rest for some nation-building... right here at home. t's time for a new economic patriotism, rooted in the... belief that growing our economy begins with a strong... thriving middle cls. read my planan. compare it to governor romney's, and decide for yourself. thanks for listening. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. >> a mother and father say the death of their 12-year-old daughter has uncovered a major problem in the school system. >> now they want to see every school employees trained in cpr. >> this is ce
correct, then that does slide into the -- that does slide from simply being bad science to something more sinister. it's not realistic to think that the 2000 will voter turnout model is valid in 2012. if they are in fact doing that and if i know it they know that it's not a good model. then you do have to wonder if pat caddell is on to something. again, i'm not a conspiracy time of guy so i'm not saying it's rigged. but if they are using a bad model and then they not only do polls, bill, then they write about their own polls and it creates an impression that it's time to write the owe -- obituary for mitt romney. >> bill: there is no that investigates the press because we have freedoms. >> it's the media that should investigate it i'm not holding my breath. >> bill: good luck with that. >> this would be the same media that's doing a lot of the polling. if they are doing the polling. >> bill: people are so distracted they don't remember three days ago what happened. this is what the media banks on. we can make a mistake, nobody is going to remember. we'll just wipe it off the blackboard an
science isn't my strong suit, myrna gives me a more physical task. >> i'm going to have you follow wes's lead here and he's going to show you what we're looking at as we're trying to make sure we've got everything, nothing is settling on the bottom of the vat. >> is that what brokit up into this? >> that's what makes it firmer. >> can i touch it? >> when you cut it and it's really, really mushy. the more they cure it the firmer it's going to get. >> oh, my gosh. my arm hurts. i swear this job is the best arm workout. >> hooping involves scooping curds into cheesecloth, and spring sprinkling salt and rolling it all together. it's fast, furious and heavy. >> put it over the top and put your hand here. >> we pack the curds into wheels and add more salt. >> it's like playing in sand. >> pretty much. >> it's a preservative, a flavoring and also a way of bringing the moisture level down in the cheese. >> am i doing it right? >> we're in one of the caves where the bleu cheese ages and it takes about six months. >> you can kind of see the bleu starting to grow on the outside. what's starting t
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> sean: the first presidential debate is two days away. judging by the president's language, seems he may be trying to downplay his upcoming performance. oh, really? >> you may have heard that in a few days my opponent in this election and i are going to have a debate. i'm looking -- i'm looking forward to it. i know folks in the media are speculating already on who's going to have the best zingers. >> you are! >> i don't know about that. who's going put the most points on the board. governor romney is a good debater. i'm just okay. >> sean: and you get a failing grade as president. who cares about zingers, when all the governor has to do is point out your awful record. joining me is author of "the new york times" bestseller "mugged" and columnist david limbaugh. >> thank you. >> sean: he's really good, but i'm terrible. mr. teleprompter -- >> by the way, why is he saying this if the show him far ahead? they know the polls are a crock. i know -- >> s
a make or break debate. >> look, david, it's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations that he has for himself. but, look, i think part of that was because as i said earlier we met a new mitt romney. we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan, which is his tax cut. i don't have a tax cut that's $4.8 trillion. i'm not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a medicare voucher plan. i love teachers. and i think we need more of them. look, don't believe me. speaker gingrich was pretty eloquent running during the primaries and saying, mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. and if somebody says absolutely anything to get elected you have to wonder what they'll say when they are president of the united states. >> so, speaker, you did say he was fundamentally dishonest after debating him in the primaries. this is not a new attack against romney policy. >> no. and i think that the challenge for the obama people is pretty simple. the president of the united states had 90 m
in science or medicine and will now be relegated to quackery. >>> and everybody's talking about arnold schwarzenegger's new book and how he had an affair with more than just the housekeeper. he chieted with actress bridget nielsen while living with maria shriver. >> you don't feel bad about it, you just write it. >> actually, i did feel bad about it. but all my various things were just mistakes. you know, my failure, my screwups. >> was that the only affair? >> no. i had others. but, you know, that's something that's obviously between marie and me. >> and we will hear from him in our next half hour. speaking of arnold, if you read only one thing this morning, i highly recommend janet maslin's review of his book. an autobiography of someone as mast master conniver. one thing you can depend on is that these will come together. delicious and wholesome. some combinations were just meant to be. tomato soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. begins with back pain and a choice. take advil, and maybe have to take up to four in a day. or take aleve, which can relieve pain all day w
, of course. but have they dictated the outcome of an election? a lot of political science suggests only twice. in the 1960s, 1960 election when richard nixon came out looking very haggard against the sharp and attractive john f. kennedy, and in 2000 when gore was condescending toward george w. bush. the point is, more than zingers, what seems to affect the outcome is your general likability. how you come across. last point, carol, i saw newt gingrich give advice to mitt romney. he said that these debates. his expert told him it's 85% visual, how you look, 10% how you say something, your tone, and 5%, only 5% what you actually say. that would certainly reinforce this likability prism. >> well, that 5%'s kind of depressing. >> it is. >> well, let me ask you this about likability. remember in 2008, obama had a problem with likability and he's turned that around. he's now the more likable candidate. there is a danger to him to appear unlikable in this debate if he gets too snippy or too condescending or too professorial. >> absolutely because he's coming from a position of authority or power. eve
the president could have done better and also took aim at governor romney. >> it's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations that he has for himself. but, look, i think part of that was because as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney. speaker gingrich was pretty eloquent in running during the primaries in saying that mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> former speaker and republican candidate newt gingrich said this morning that president obama has no excuse. >> the president of the united states had 90 minutes. now, if he had done his homework and actually prepared and actually studied romney, why didn't he say it? i mean why didn't he take romney head-on? the job of the president is supposed to be competent and be able to stand up for what he believes in and to be able to articulate what's wrong. mitt romney walked over him. >>> right now, president obama is on his way to los angeles for two days of fundraising in california. tonight he'll appear at a star-studded fundraising rally in los angeles where bon jovi, stevie wond
of science fiction. but it is quite, quite real. take a look at this. this is an ear that doctors at johns hopkins grew on the arm of a cancer patient. an ear growing on an arm. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us now live from atlanta. elizabeth, we've been looking at this picture all morning. explain it to me. what's going on here? >> john, i don't know if you saw it, i went like this, still even though i've seen it so many times. it's such an eye-popping image. what's going on here is that a woman named sherry walter had cancer, skin cancer on her ear, and they needed to remove almost all of her outer ear. plus some of the structures that were inside because the cancer had spread. and so what they did was they thought, wow, i wonder if we could grow her an ear. they took some cartilage from her ribs and fashioned it into the shape of an ear, but this doesn't look like the real ear, it needed skin. so they put the cartilage that was shaped into an ear under her arm and they waited four months. the skin grew over it. they took it out, and they put it on her head and she
of the house, science, space, and technology committee as well as a confer rei on -- conferee on the faa committee, i realize making the skies safer, less congested, and cleaner requires substantial investments. we must invest in the future, but we have to invest wisely. i'm concerned with the department of transportation, inspector general's april 2012 # report that the en route implementation schedule slipped by four years, and over budgeted by $330 million. in addition, i understand that although progress is being made, the agency has had difficulties in developing performance metrics for next generation goals. i want to thank you chairman petri and ranking member costillo, for holding the hearing, and i look forward to the testimony of the witnesses today because i believe we have to implement the next generation technology. thank you, and i yield back. >> thank you, and now we turn to the first panel, and i'd like to welcome the honorable john portcari, the u.s. secretary of the department of transportation, the acting administrator of the faa. welcome to both of you, and our regula
at science history, cyber world, popular culture and computer networking in politics. live at noon eastern on book tv on c-span2. >> next a symposium on partisan politics and compromise. this hour and a half event is hosted by the university of southern california schwarzenegger's institute for state and global policy. panelists include senator john mccain and former senator tom daschle. >> we all breathe the same air. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the chairman of the institute and the inaugural holder of the governor downey chair professor of state and global policy at u.s.e., governor arnold schwarzenegger. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you very much. thank you very much for the fantastic introduction. that's exactly the way i wrote it. [laughter] also thank you very much for your great partnership. one thing i wanted to correct what you said today is i did not win miss universe. different bikinis, waxing, all of those things i did not win that competition. it's mr. universe. anyway, i want to say how enthusiastic i am about being in partnership with u.s.c. the preside
political science. >> all right. are you ready? >> question one. >> yes. >> which of the following is not a college mascot? "a," the fighting pickle? "b" -- >> keep going. keep going. >> banana slug, the leafy sea dragons or the trolls? >> go. >> the leafy thing. >> the leafy sea dragon. university of georgia school of the arts. while the trolls are from trinity college. question two. in the climactic scene in the film "rudy," what football team is notre dame playing when rudy finally gets in the game? university of southern california? georgia tech? university of michigan? or "d," university of tennessee? >> get it right. >> come on, you're on your own. >> michigan. >> not university of michigan. what do you think? >> georgia tech? >> georgia tech. okay. next question. listen up. on the periodic table of elements, the symbols "k" and "h" each stand for what? is it -- >> oh, oh! >> tennessee. >> natural resources. >> helium, carbon and mercury, potassium and hydrogen or krypton and hydrogen? >> potassium and hydrogen. >> it's potassium and hydrogen. all right. next question. >> che
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)